Energy

The world has in recent months witnessed a dramatic turnabout on the future of nuclear energy, mainly in the developed countries.

This is on the back of the Russia-Ukraine war which has seen post-pandemic energy shortages turn into a full-blown energy crisis.

According to the International Monetary Fund (IMF), nuclear power plants slated for closure across Europe have been given “an 11th hour reprieve.

Japan has announced, after a decade of paralysis, that it plans to restart many of its reactors, which have sat idle since the nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi.

France, which had launched plans to reduce its dependence on nuclear energy during President Macron’s first term, reversed course and now, plans to build at least six new reactors and a dozen smaller modular reactors.

The UK on the other hand recently launched an ambitious plan to build eight new reactors and16 small modular reactors.

Even anti-nuclear Germany

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  • Rwanda will receive two loans amounting to $180 million from the African Development Bank 
  • The funds will support a major energy project that will extend electricity access to rural areas and reduce greenhouse gas emissions
  • It entails the construction of over 1,000 km of medium voltage and 3,300 km of low voltage lines to boost last-mile access
  • The project is expected to connect 77,470 households to the electricity network for the first time and connect 75 schools, eight health centres and 65 administration centres

Rwanda will receive two loans amounting to $180 million from the African Development Bank (AfDB) to co-finance a major energy project that will extend electricity access to rural areas and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

In a statement seen by The Exchange Africa, the AfDB said the new funding follows the approval for $84.2 million made in May 2021 for the same project.

According to the lender, …

In March 2022, while trying to clarify the power situation in Nigeria, TCN reiterated that out of 23 gas-powered stations with a combined capacity of more than 10,000 MW, at least 14 were either shut down or operated at reduced capacity. Two in three power stations have either halted operations or operating below par. It is projected that Nigerians privately generate up to 40,000 MW to address the grid deficit.

According to TCN spokeswoman Ndidi Mbah, the power companies attribute this trend to various factors, including scheduled and unscheduled maintenance, faults in generating units of generating companies, and poor gas supply. However, all these factors cause power generating companies to limit their generating capacities or halt generation altogether. However, the challenges appear to run deeper.             

All Progressives Congress Party, after assuming office in 2015, alleged that many of the power companies had been sold by the former People’s Democratic Party …

President Muhammadu Buhari said in an interview with Sun Nigeria that he was discontented with electricity in Nigeria.

The All Electricity Consumers Protection Forum expressed the same discontent with the power sector and pointed the slow progress in the power sector to the Nigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission (NERC).

The forum has advised President Buhari to do away with the power regulator in the country, NERC, and move the responsibilities to the Federal Competition and Consumer Protection Commission (FCCPC).…

  • In pursuit of bringing about electrification to the continent, the energy sector was abuzz with activity in 2021
  • In September 2021, for instance, Uganda launched the last-mile connectivity component to connect 87,500 rural households with affordable electricity
  • In June 2021, the World Bank Board approved US$200 million in International Development Association (IDA) funding to help Benin improve its access to electricity services for households, businesses, and essential public services

Africa is the world's least electrified continent, with nearly 600 million people in sub-Saharan Africa or 53 per cent of the population still living in the dark in 2021, according to data by The Economist. 

In pursuit of bringing about electrification to the continent, the energy sector was abuzz with activity in 2021. Below are some of the most significant electrification projects that have been ongoing in Africa in the past year.

  1. Uganda's last-mile connectivity project 

In September 2021, Uganda launched

While the world is fighting for zero-carbon neutrality, Africa’s—and Kenya's—struggle to achieve a zero-carbon footprint is being met with foreign challenges and local corruption. 

Experts have lauded the government’s plan to shift Kenya’s energy to purely clean energy by 2030.

In October 2021, President Uhuru Kenyatta told attendees of the COP26 summit that the country would achieve the milestone, seeing that it was more than half-way there already. 

“Renewable energy in Kenya currently accounts for 73 per cent of the installed power generation capacity, while 90 per cent of the electricity in use is from clean sources,” he told attendees, among them US President Joe Biden and UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson.  “We are on course to achieve our target of 100 per cent use of clean energy by 2030 and to achieve 100 per cent access to clean cooking by 2028,” Kenyatta said.

The Exchange Africa sought the views

  • Demand for electricity in Kenya has reached a new record this week rising to a peak of 2,036MW
  • The country recorded a new energy gross demand peak of 36,381MWh mostly drawn from renewable energy sources

The demand for electricity in Kenya hit a new record this week rising to a peak of 2,036MW, the highest ever recorded in history, marking a significant resurgence in demand since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020.

At the same time, the country recorded a new energy gross demand peak of 36,381MWh mostly drawn from renewable energy sources as the economy responds positively to the lifting of some of the COVID-19 related restrictions.

National energy generator, Kenya Electricity Generating Company (KenGen), contributed to the largest jump in renewable energy share with the company scaling up production in its geothermal, hydro and wind power stations to meet the growing demand.

According to a …

The Djiboutian venture is part of KenGen’s ambitious diversification strategy, in which the company is seeking to acquire new revenue streams by offering commercial drilling services, geothermal consulting and other related services across Africa.

This is the third mega geothermal drilling contract that KenGen is implementing in Africa. In October 2019, the company secured a KSh 5.8 billion contract to drill 12 geothermal wells in Ethiopia.

The contract with Ethiopia’s independent power producer Tulu Moye Geothermal Operations (TMGO) PLC includes installing a water supply system and equipment.…

  • KenGen has completed drilling the deepest geothermal well in Ethiopia reaching a depth of 3,000 meters
  • This marks the second of eight geothermal wells KenGen has been contracted to drill for the state-owned electricity producer, Ethiopia Electric Power Company 
  • In February 2019, KenGen won a contract to offer geothermal drilling services for EEP in the Aluto-Langano geothermal fields in Ethiopia
Kenya Electricity Generating Company PLC (KenGen) has completed drilling the deepest geothermal well in Ethiopia reaching a depth of 3,000 meters, surpassing a target of 2,750 meters.
This marks the second of eight geothermal wells KenGen has been contracted to drill for the state-owned electricity producer, Ethiopia Electric Power Company which was delivered successfully amid the COVID-19 pandemic.
“We are happy to see our teams deliver the same level of success in the Horn of Africa as we do back home in Olkaria where we have also drilled several geothermal