Why inflation won't hurt all retirees

By The Exchange Team

Despite lowering gas prices, August inflation was greater than projected, dampening hopes for decreased daily expenses. Experts say some retirees won't experience higher costs.

Annual inflation jumped 8.3% in August, pushed by rising food, shelter, and medical care prices, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Tuesday.

When health care is excluded, seniors tend to spend less in real terms on other categories until they reach the age of 80.

Senior citizens may spend less altogether.

When health care is excluded, seniors tend to spend less in real terms on other categories until they reach the age of 80.

Senior citizens may spend less altogether.

These findings correspond with a SmartAsset analysis showing retirement spending decreases in 11 of 14 core areas.

The rising expense of health care is a concern, but it's not enough to counterbalance retirees' spending on housing, food, and transportation.

Retirees’ expenses generally decline over time.

According to the J.P. Morgan analysis, it is critical for retirees to have a long-term view on inflation.