Browsing: Business in Africa

It is critical to strengthen a professional, independent supervision secretariat to make the AfCFTA agreement’s promise a reality. A strong secretariat can assist states in developing strong domestic institutions to administer, monitor, and enforce the AfCFTA. The moment for change has arrived. The conventional development models have failed Africa. The AfCFTA, on the other hand, signifies that Africa is open for business.

Africa’s financial potential has become an interesting prospect for emerging market investors. Three decades ago a proposal to invest in Africa would have been considered ridiculous, but this is no longer the case. In fact, between 2006 and 2011, the continent was registering the highest returns on FDI at 11.4 percent, even higher than Asia at 9.1 percent, while the global average was 7.1 percent. To add to that according to the World Economic Forum, since 2000 “half of the world’s fastest-growing economies have been in Africa. As western markets mature and foreign investments saturate in Asia, Latin America, Central and Eastern Europe, and India, Africa is fast becoming the most lucrative investment destination. The inefficient African markets are an excellent source of excess returns, given the level of perceived risks. 

The pandemic has shown the globe that more is needed to fortify our systems, as nearly 95 million people have contracted the virus and more than two million people have succumbed to it, while millions face the economic shocks of the virus, particularly those located in developing economies. 

A World Economic Forum (WEF) publication which is part of The Davos Agenda (a virtual global leaders’ meeting on sustaining an inclusive and cohesive future) noted that the pandemic has exposed several threats to the world.