Browsing: EU

According to the statement, the Forum will have several interactive engagements and presentations focusing on opportunities for Namibian and EU traders, agriculture and agro-processing, manufacturing, and trade facilitation and logistics.

The ministry of trade serves as the coordinator for the plan’s initial goal, which is to provide improved coordination and cooperation across institutions and organizations addressing areas related to EPA implementation.

It is also concentrated on establishing and enhancing the performance of important institutions involved in EPA implementation.

Making a case for technical support to strengthen the necessary legal, institutional, and infrastructure frameworks for Namibia’s EPA implementation is the third point of emphasis.

While the government of Tanzania has not listed specific projects that the Global Gateway grant will finance, the country already has several green initiatives underway and is leading the region in digital transformation.

The EU envisions that through the grant funding various solutions will be realized under five main banners; green transition, digital transition, accelerating sustainable growth and decent job creation, strengthening health systems and improving education and training

In this regard, the EU is of the view that tackling the global challenge of climate change, it must work with Africa to maximise the benefits of the green transition and minimise threats to the environment in full compliance with the Paris Agreement, as stated in the official EU statement.

The ministry argued that the oil pipeline project is being implemented strictly on international safety, environmental and social aspects, including the Human Rights Impact Assessment (HRIA).

The EACOP project has managed to amass at least US$20 billion, benefiting the two neighbouring nations immensely. That’s why Tanzania is stern on highlighting key issues regarding human rights and environmental risks.

“A dedicated HRIA was undertaken as part of the project implementation process. The HRIA assessed and put in place measures for addressing the potential adverse of the project on the human rights enjoyment,” the statement pointed out.

According to the EU Parliament statement, at least 100,000 people have been forced to move out of their homes to leave the path for the pipeline.

Over the past years, Ethiopia has become one of the primary beneficiaries of the EU Trust Fund for Africa.

According to information from European Commission, in total, the value of EU development assistance to Ethiopia has averaged an estimated 214 Euro ($225 million) per year. 

However, when Ethiopia was dragged down through the most gruesome internal political turmoil – the Tigray War – relations between the Horn of Africa and the EU was at an all-time low.  

The EU followed close on the heels of Ethiopia’s close development partner, the United States, and threatened sanctions on the Ethiopian government in a deliberate attempt to quench the conflict.  

At the dawn of his administration, President Mnangagwa promised to address the country’s record on human rights, targeting those that oppress political activists and opposition, political party supporters, during elections. He also said his government would introduce economic policies favouring foreign investment. His mantra was ‘Zimbabwe is Open for Business. In its quest to kick-start itself to its former glory, the Zimbabwean government came up with economic policies such as the Look East Policy, and Indigenization, but they failed to yield results.

Mnangagwa’s administration has been rallying anti-sanctions sentiments, embarking on a re-engagement policy and the ‘Zimbabwe is Open for Business mantra. But, the sanctions have remained in place.

According to Afrobarometer, Mnangagwa has managed to mobilize support against the sanctions. In October 2019, leaders of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) agreed to campaign for the removal of the sanctions, arguing that they destabilize Zimbabwe’s economy and adversely affect the region. ZimEye reported a group of ZANU-PF supporters who camped near the U.S. Embassy in Harare on March 29, 2019, and vowed to stay put until the sanctions were lifted.

The company was struggling following a significant decline in the late 90s. In a related article published by ZBC News at its utmost, the giant used to employ over 4,500 people thereby making it one of the country’s biggest employers.

Further, in addition to beef production, the company also produced a large variety of by-products such as hides, neat’s foot oil, ox gall, edible offal’s, tallow and dripping, canned meats, ham, blood meal, meat and bone meal and pork sausages among others. The institution is the lifeblood of livestock farmers and the leather value chain.

The government is targeting the revitalization of the institution under the National Development Strategy One (NDS1). The government in May 2019, signed a US$400 million joint venture farming Concession Agreement with Boustead Beef Zimbabwe, a United Kingdom-based investor. The venture was reportedly based on a Concession Agreement under Rehabilitation, Operate and Transfer (ROT) Terms.

The fund was allocated for capital expenditures and as working capital for the business. Apart from that, it will be used to pay in full CSC’s financial debts of US$43 million. Rentals of US$100,000 per year will also be paid during the first five years of the concession agreement.

The Africa-Europe D4D Hub Multi-Stakeholder Forum on Digital Transformation for Sustainable Development in Africa was held one month after the 6th European Union–African Union Summit, where leaders from both continents announced a EUR 150 billion Africa-Europe Investment Package, which amongst other priorities aims to accelerate Africa’s sustainable digital transformation.

“This ambition aligns with the EU Global Gateway, a strategy set out to boost smart, clean, and secure investments in connectivity, and the AU Digital Transformation Strategy for Africa 2020 – 2030, which aims to transform Africa’s economies and societies by harnessing digital technologies, the potential of data and innovation for the benefit of people. It also supports the outcomes of the 35th AU Summit, held from 5 to 6 February 2022, which called for the acceleration of Africa’s quality infrastructure development.” read a news release issued by EU-Africa Digital Hub today.

It is reported that only 33 per cent of African people use the Internet, compared to a world average of 63 per cent, closing the digital divide and connecting the unconnected meaningfully has become a top priority in AU-EU relations, said AU-EU digital summit participants adding that joint efforts are particularly needed to ensure that women, rural populations, and youth reap the benefits of the digital transformation.

Zimbabwe chastised the West for averting Harare’s breakdown by denying “access to markets for Zimbabwe’s diamonds sector” and causing “disinvestment, corporate closures, and a currency collapse” in a document titled “Economic Impact of Sanctions on Zimbabwe.”
Zimbabwe, which is thought to hold 25% of the world’s diamond reserves, has sunk deeper into international turmoil following revelations that over USUS$14 billion had been taken by oligarchs in the Marange highlands, where the US has expressed concerns about forced labour and human rights abuses.
Security forces mercilessly attacked illegal miners around the end of 2008 to gain sole ownership of the mines for the state, prompting the West to label Harare’s jewels “blood diamonds.”