Browsing: Namibia

Namibia debt-to-GDP

Namibia has made progress on structural changes to foster economic diversification and boost productivity. Improving the business environment, promoting access to capital, improving governance, and decreasing skills mismatches are crucial for stimulating growth and achieving long-term debt sustainability.

Senegal’s oil and gas discoveries account for only 0.07 per cent and 0.5 per cent, respectively, of world reserves.

But Senegal’s Petroleum and Energies Minister Sophie Gladima said, “they are important enough to radically change the economy and industrial fabric of our country and thereby its future prospects.”

“Just exploiting our hydrocarbons will enable us to accelerate public access to electricity and, above all, to lower the cost of production and encourage industrialisation.”

She further underlined the legal framework needed to bring thousands of Senegalese jobs into the sector and the setting up of the National Institute of Oil and Gas to turn out a highly qualified workforce.

Funny enough, Namibia, also admitted as a member, is not yet producing any oil. Namibia recently announced that it would consider joining the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries if the oil fields are found to be large enough for commercial development.

According to the statement, the Forum will have several interactive engagements and presentations focusing on opportunities for Namibian and EU traders, agriculture and agro-processing, manufacturing, and trade facilitation and logistics.

The ministry of trade serves as the coordinator for the plan’s initial goal, which is to provide improved coordination and cooperation across institutions and organizations addressing areas related to EPA implementation.

It is also concentrated on establishing and enhancing the performance of important institutions involved in EPA implementation.

Making a case for technical support to strengthen the necessary legal, institutional, and infrastructure frameworks for Namibia’s EPA implementation is the third point of emphasis.

FlyNamibia will adopt Airlink’s “4Z” International Air Transport Association (IATA) designator for its ticket sales and scheduled flights under a commercial franchise agreement. Although it will continue to operate under its own commercial risk.

Namibia’s only scheduled carrier will retain its own corporate identity, brand, and aircraft livery.

According to an announcement made at a news conference in Windhoek on September 28, 2022. FlyNamibia’s inventory will be promoted on Airlink’s reservation system and through its international codeshare partnerships and the changes will come into effect as soon as practicable.

Airlink and FlyNamibia will also optimise their schedules to provide the most convenient connections between their respective flights and with long-haul intercontinental flights provided by Airlink’s other commercial partners, which include more than 20 of the world’s leading global airlines.

The regulator said retailers would be free to allocate up to 10% of chilled space/refrigerators in each beverage cooler owned by NBL or Distell Namibia in any on- and off-consumption outlet in Namibia.

“This allocation right will apply only to products manufactured or packaged in Namibia by Namibian-owned and Namibian-controlled companies. The existing NBL commercial policy must be amended, and the merged entity will educate its employees and inform the market of the new changes to its commercial policy,” the conditions read.

The commission said it identified entry barriers as a concern, particularly the ability of small Namibian companies to enter the market.

NBL’s commercial policy prohibited retailers from placing other products in NBL-branded refrigerators. After the merger, the likelihood of this policy being enforced could deter or limit the entry of Namibian-owned and Namibian-controlled undertakings into the market.

Once fully embraced by all Member States, the free movement of people within Africa is expected to have many important positive effects, including an increase in intra-African trade, commerce, and tourism; easier labour mobility; knowledge and skill sharing within Africa; the promotion of pan-African identity, social integration, and tourism; an improvement in trans-border infrastructure and shared development; the encouragement of an all-encompassing approach to border management; and the promotion of the rule of law, human rights, and shared development

Nationals of Namibia and Botswana will no longer require passports to travel between the two nations after the presidents of those nations decided to open their borders to one another.

The declaration was made at the opening ceremony of the Botswana-Namibia binational commission at the Gaborone International Convention Center by Namibian President Hage Geingob.

Paladin is restarting its Langer Heinrich uranium mine in Namibia that was idled due to low prices. Australian uranium producers, including Paladin, have raised close to US$282.08 million in share sales this year to fund exploration and resuscitate mines.

The current primary uranium supply is unable to meet demand, and the deficit is being met by secondary supplies and inventory drawdowns, Paladin CEO Ian Purdy said at the Digger & Dealers Mining Forum in Kalgoorlie, Australia.

The average annual deficit is projected to be in the range of 40 million pounds over the coming decade, he told the forum.

In June, Zawya Projects announced that Namibia had received 25 submissions for pilot projects, from which it plans to select no more than five.

The four projects – the Daures, Namport, Cleanergy, and TransNamib projects – have a combined value of over N$890 million (53,39 million euros), and some of the funds will be sourced by the initiators of the projects. The four projects will be located in the Erongo region, which has been marked as ‘valley 1’ of the envisaged national hydrogen ecosystem.

De Beers also said the ship’s state-of-the-art dynamic positioning system optimizes its performance in changing weather conditions to minimize energy use. It also generates fresh water through its heat recovery systems and a reverse osmosis plant.

“The Benguela Gem is the first of its kind and represents an outstanding feat of engineering design, technology innovation, and sustainability performance,” said De Beers Group CEO Bruce Cleaver.

The vessel was designed and built in Europe, and the mission equipment was designed and built in Cape Town in large modules parallel to the vessel built in Europe. The mission equipment was then integrated into the vessel in Cape Town by De Beers Marine.

In terms of performance, according to an article by The Namibian dated July 29, 2022, South Africa, Botswana, and Canada all saw diamond production levels dipping at 4%, 4%, and 24%, respectively.