Browsing: Oil in Nigeria

Tanzania Oil and Gas ATOGS

The second issue the MoU covers is building capacity on health and safety standards, which is another key disqualifier marked on local companies when competing with global actors in the oil and gas market.

Further, the MoU brings onboard knowledge to help the local technocrats, upcoming companies, and experts submit and succeed at various tenders offered on the international markets. In most cases, local companies have lost tender bids to experienced foreign companies.

“We need the local players to understand deeply about these oil and gas related tenders and deliver within the internationally recognized standards”, He added.

The ATOGS chief didn’t hold back his grand ambition to transform Tanzania’s business operations for the greater good, highlighting Nigeria’s success story.…

  • Uganda, Kenya, and Tanzania are building their oil and gas economies at a very fast pace
  • Algeria is Africa’s leading natural gas producer, with almost 2.4 trillion cubic meters of proven reserves
  • Nigeria is Africa’s largest oil producer, and Africa accounted for approximately eight per cent of the global oil output in 2020

When it comes to oil and gas in Africa, there is plenty of potential to produce enough energy on the continent.

Africa accounted for approximately eight per cent of the global oil output in 2020. Similarly, at least 330 million metric tonnes of oil will be produced in Africa in 2020 (Statista). Global oil and gas players such as ExxonMobil, Shell, Equinor, and BP are pushing the continent forward.

The energy sector in East Africa is rapidly expanding its commercial potential thanks to Tanzania. The EACOP pipeline, upstream offshore gas projects, LNG project discussions, and various renewable …

Tanzania has been ambitious from day one to strike oil. However, it took a while to find oil deposits, and it will take time to commercialize the oil discovered—a tedious but necessary process.

Oil and gas exploration in Tanzania has been taking place since 1952. The Discovery of oil reserves in Tanzania’s Wembere-Eyasi proves the long wait was worth a while.

In the same suit as its neighbouring nation, Tanzania is to undergo a rigorous process to commercialize the oil discovered entirely.

For instance, in Kenya, which discovered oil and experienced the first stages of (testing) exporting at least 200,000 barrels—the nation is working to build the functioning and healthy infrastructure necessary to tap the existing potential.…

On Oct. 1, 1960, everything seemed possible for Nigeria: After nearly 80 years of colonialism under Great Britain, it was finally an independent nation.

During the newly independent nation’s earliest days, there was every reason for Nigerians to envision a bright future for themselves and their country, one in which Nigeria’s vast oil and gas reserves would deliver widespread prosperity. One of stability and growth.

Tragically, Nigeria’s story moved in a different direction. Yes, there was a brief period of economic growth, but that was followed by multiple coups, civil war, military rule, corruption, and poverty. Instead of helping everyday Nigerians, the country’s oil wealth went to an elite few in power while leaving communities, particularly those in the Niger Delta, to deal with environmental degradation and dwindling means of supporting themselves. Instead of using its oil revenue to strengthen other sectors and diversify the economy, Nigeria has made oil

Brent crude oil’s return to a $40/b handle has so far proved to be short-lived. During the past week the oil market has continued to move higher in the belief that the OPEC+ group of producers would extend a deal to curb production. Thereby continuing their support for the market while demand slowly recover.

Saudi Arabia and Russia, the leaders of the group, have preliminary agreed on a one-month extension of existing OPEC+ cuts. The problem, however, is once again what to do with countries that fail to deliver the promised cuts. Moscow, usually a laggard in previous deals, has almost reached its target of 8.5 million barrels/day. That has left the group in a stronger position to demand compliance from others.

 

Once again the focus has returned to Iraq and Nigeria, OPEC’s notorious cheaters, who for years now have failed to deliver fully on any of the previous …