Browsing: FOCAC

Us-China Trade wars are fostering development in Africa. www.theexchange.africa

Africa is home to at least 47 foreign military outposts, with the US controlling the largest number. Djibouti is the only country in the world to host both American and Chinese outposts.

A recent survey by Afrobarometer across 34 countries indicated that 63 per cent of the population see China’s influence in Africa as positive, whilst 60 per cent made similar comments about the US. Are there benefits to be extracted from this searing rivalry?

Africa’s Agenda 2063 on the ‘Africa we want’ set by the African Union, advocates under its first aspiration, a ‘Prosperous Africa based on inclusive growth and sustainable development’ and ‘A Strong, United, Resilient and Influential Global Player and Partner’ under aspiration 7.…

Subscribe to unlock this article

Login to read this article for free and get 3 free premium articles. Subscribe today for unlimited premium articles and more.

Digital Subscription – Monthly

Monthly renewing

An action plan totalling US$40 billion in trade finance, commercial investments, and a share of Chinese SDRs was announced at the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (Focac) in late November (SDR).

Despite the eye-catching headline, the actual amount pledged at the two most recent forums in 2015 and 2018 is far less than the US$60bn promised.

China has used concessional loans to fund a wide range of continent-wide infrastructure projects, including trains, airports, highways, and power plants.…

Huawei puts China in a data superiority position in its involvement in countries’ sensitive information. 

China is establishing dominance in digital models. In June, Nigeria banned and dumped Twitter in the country, and has drawn parallels with China in their censorship model development. 

According to Abishek, the data centre in Senegal is one of the many being built by Chinese firms to help Africa keep up with social and economic changes that are pressuring the infrastructure on the continent. …

Globalization has encouraged open trade between continents. In a bid to gain economic dominance, the top industrialist nations have engaged in sometimes aggressive foreign policies to secure natural resources to support their growing industries. Although this is not entirely negative, there needs to be an objective analysis of whether such relations are mutually beneficial, or one party is left prejudiced while the other has gained. 

One such relationship that has garnered controversy over the past few decades is the China-Africa affiliation. This article will analyze relations between China and Africa in the context of the political, economic, and ecological environments.

Chinese interests in fostering African relations

Africa enjoys the second largest Chinese investment, after Asia. The predominant reason for this being that Africa is endowed with an abundance of natural resources and China is eager to benefit from these resources in its pursuit of economic dominance. The main interests that

The Tanzania Trade Development Authority (TanTrade) said in a statement issued on Wednesday that the country is set to participate in the first China-Africa Economic and Trade Expo to be held in Changsha, the capital of central China’s Hunan province between 18th and 20th June, 2019.

The body has also urged the local companies to grab the `golden chance` provided by the trade expo which will focus on trade, investment, finance, agriculture, mining, energy, tourism and infrastructure.

Officials will sign bilateral agreements during the exhibition, engage in investment promotions, and establish a “new mechanism” for future economic cooperation.

The expo is part of a slew of promises made by president Xi Jinping during last September’s Forum on China–Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) in Beijing. During his speech to African leaders, President Xi proposed eight initiatives aimed at pursuing a “win-win” strategy giving new impetus to economic, political, and security collaboration. …