Browsing: foreign exchange

De-dollarise African trade

There appears to be a consensus that the world is finally turning its back on the US dollar. There are simmering shifts within the global monetary system. The shift becomes ever more apparent, best described as de-dollarisation.

The world is searching for alternatives to the US dollar, finding them more often. Thus, moving away from the dollar can no longer be stopped. For instance, early this year, Indonesia reiterated it would promote local currency settlement (LCS) in cross-border trade and investment to reduce dependence on the US dollar.…

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A currency crisis is defined as a quick and abrupt depreciation of a country’s currency. Currency depreciation goes in tandem with turbulent markets and a loss of confidence in the country’s economy. Historically, crises have arisen when market expectations induce significant movements in the value of currencies.

The global economy is now in turmoil. As the world economy enters another era of a currency crisis, the value of the US dollar keeps rising. Over half of all international trade is billed in dollars. A stronger dollar thus hurts consumers globally, particularly in Africa, who rely on dollars to pay for imports.

The US Federal Reserve’s hawkish approach to increasing interest rates more aggressively than central banks in other major countries has contributed to the dollar’s appreciation. The fact that investors generally see the dollar as a “safe haven” asset during times of economic turmoil has added to its resilience.…

Countries must continue to work to mitigate their vulnerabilities over time. This involves minimizing balance-sheet misalignments, establishing money and foreign exchange markets, and lowering exchange rate passthrough by increasing monetary policy credibility.

However, in the short term—while vulnerabilities remain high—the use of extra instruments may assist relieve short-term policy trade-offs when certain shocks occur. In particular, foreign exchange intervention, macroprudential policy measures, and capital flow controls may help increase monetary and fiscal policy autonomy, promote financial and price stability, and minimize output volatility if reserves are enough and these instruments are available.…

Among Zimbabweans, there is a clear preference for the use of the United States dollar over the local currency. This is to the extent that there are some government services which cannot be accessed without United States dollars.

There are also some basic household commodities and goods that one will need to pay for using hard currency and will not be able to purchase if they have the local currency. Following on the issue of the currency crisis is the fact that exporters are already heavily burdened with operating costs in United States dollars.

Regardless of whether it is an exporter or partial exporter, 40 per cent of all export proceeds generated by Zimbabwean-based exporters must be surrendered to the central bank. This is how the central bank has been funding its auction system to allocate foreign exchange to importers.

To be fair, the surrender requirements are not uniformly or …

  • Tanzania managed to attract Foreign Direct Investments (FDIs) totaling 2.9 billion US Dollars in five months between March and August.
  • Tanzania’s total foreign reserves reached a historical high, sailing well above the regional benchmarks.
  • The central bank attributed the reserve increase to exports of goods and services that increased by 6,1 percent.

During the tumultuous period, of Covid-19 Tanzania’s economy largely operated under the premise of business as usual. Despite this approach, the country was less confronted with an unavoidable slowdown in some of its key sectors but not all may be tourism got its fair share of the effect of Covid-19, which resulted to the slowdowns in the economies of its key trading partners.

In May 2020, when many countries in the region were starting to realize the full extent of the short- to mid-term economic crisis associated with Covid-19, the Monetary Policy Committee of the Bank of Tanzania …

Forex Market is a global financial market where currencies are traded and exchanged. Retail investors can participate in this market for the purpose of speculation or hedging.

Trading in the forex market is especially popular in Africa, and the market is regulated by CMA in Kenya. Lower barriers to entry for investors, and entry of more regulated players in the industry has led to growth in CFD trading & forex trading in Kenya.

The Covid-19 pandemic has led to a huge surge in the trading volume in Africa. But most retail investors are unaware of the risks associated with CFD & forex trading, and this puts them at risk of losing their capital or even more.

We look at the state of local online forex trading industry since it has been regulated and the risks that online forex trading pose to retail investors.

Growth and Concerns

Kenya based broker comparison …

On October 12th, Law no. 35/20 – the Free Trade Zones Law (“FTZL”) – was passed. The FTZL has established benefits to be conceded to investors by the Angolan Government, aiming at attracting foreign investment in Angola thus creating economic growth.

All types of investment are permitted in the Free Zones, specifically investment in agriculture, industry (that use Angolan raw materials and are focused on exportation) and technology. Specific aspects pertaining the access to Free Zones (such as monetary requirements, number of jobs created, investments in fixed assets) shall be determined in the investment contract.

Access to the Free Zones is permitted to companies, joint ventures, groups of companies or any other form of companies’ representation, whose scope meets the purpose of the Free Zones.

The investments made in Free Zones must take into account environmental protection interests.

Activities to be developed in the Free Zones
In the Free Zones …

The impact technology has on our world is profound and, some might say, immeasurable. Outside our personal lives, it continues to change industries and global markets at a rapid pace every single day. Foreign exchange, or forex, is one of those financial institutions that are evolving with groundbreaking advancements. But before we can fully appreciate the effects of disruptive technology on forex today and possibly the future, we have to look at how it began.

How Forex Was Traded in the Past

Trading forex is as old as the history of civilizations. In ancient times, people exchanged goods and services for a price, even if that price was represented by raw materials or food. The problem was assigning value fairly — people disagreed on whether or not the items being bartered were equal to each other. To solve this, Thought Co. points out that early civilizations developed commodity money and …