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Interestingly if the US$9 million which the company said it lost from the statutory surrender requirement is added back to the top-line revenue, it will take the company’s revenues for the 2021 financial year to just above US$ 24 million which would be higher than what it achieved in 2020. This policy position which the company lamented needs revision by the authorities as it is inflicting real financial harm to companies that are Zimbabwe’s biggest exporters and earners of foreign exchange.

In the 2021 financial year, Padenga Holdings Limited incurred higher interest expenses at US$ 10,138,637 which was up from US$ 6,665,084.00 the previous year. The increase in this cost category was due to leverage and borrowings which Padenga employed in rehabilitating the Eureka gold mine which is now in full production and is also responsible for the increase in group revenues.

The company enjoyed increased production from its gold mining operations. The company sold a staggering 976 kilograms of gold which was higher than the 722 kilograms of gold sold in 2020. The increase in gold production came from the newly commissioned Eureka gold mine. From its crocodile operations, Padenga Holdings Limited sold a total of 55,341 skins which was less than the 72,244 skins it sold in 2020. The Zimbabwe crocodile operation sold 39,936 skins down from 43,254 skins that it sold in 2020.

Not to be mistaken the adverse impact of the times have been felt at Richemont with sales for the half-year ending 30 September 2020 decreasing significantly by 26 per cent to €5.48 billion against the previous year. This decline in sales resulted in a fall in operating profits of 61 per cent from €1.165 billion to €452 million.

Notwithstanding this slowdown in profits, the company was able to deliver a 78 per cent increase in sales from their China market which has now been overtaken by the Americas as the company’s largest market.

The country’s changing demographics and improved business environment are among factors contributing to increasing consumption. Continent-wide, this consumption is predicted to hit US$2.5 trillion by 2030.  

In less than 10 years, seven Sub-Saharan African countries including Kenya, Tanzania, Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Nigeria, Egypt and South Africa will be home to half of Africa’s population. Of this, an estimated 43 per cent of Africans across the continent will be in the middle or upper classes.

The country’s changing demographics and improved business environment are among factors contributing to increasing consumption. Continent-wide, this consumption is predicted to hit US$2.5 trillion by 2030.  

In less than 10 years, seven Sub-Saharan African countries including Kenya, Tanzania, Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Nigeria, Egypt and South Africa will be home to half of Africa’s population. Of this, an estimated 43 per cent of Africans across the continent will be in the middle or upper classes.