Browsing: Taxation

As a low-middle-income country, Tanzania is fairly doing its best in financing its development efforts by utilising its internal funding strategies, and tax is a part of that.

In the past five years, under the leadership of the late President John Magufuli, Tanzania broke its revenue collection record and managed to self-finance nearly 40 per cent of dividends collected from companies it holds a stake in.

Earlier last year, Tanzania Revenue Authority (TRA) hit a record collection of 100.02 per cent of its total revenue in December 2019, of which it exceeded its monthly target, which was more than $860 million.

Read: Tanzania considers tax breaks to cushion economy

“This is the highest score for a particular month since an establishment of TRA” the former TRA Commissioner General, Dr Edwin Mhede noted.

According to the former taxman, this magnificent record-breaking achievement was a fruit of hard labour put on enforcement …

The Lesotho Revenue Authority is set to receive a loan of $4.25 million from the African Development Bank Group to provide digital tax services, including e-taxation and e-payment that will broaden the country’s tax base and boost government revenue.

In a statement, AfDB says the funds will be sourced from the African Development Fund, the Group’s concessional lending window and will go to support the Supplemental Financing of the Lesotho Tax Modernization Project.

The project follows the Lesotho Tax Modernization Project (LTMP) approved in November 2017, and for which the African Development Bank Group provided $7.09 million, in financing.

The financing will especially be used to procure and install e-taxation, e-payment, and e-invoicing software and hardware and to integrate financial institutions and mobile money providers into e-payment systems.

Kenya, Lesotho sign three deals to ramp up bilateral ties

According to the Bank’s Director of Governance and Financial Management Coordination, Abdoulaye …

As at 2015 the informal sector employed over 80% of the Kenyan working population as was reported in an article published by the Institute of Economic Affairs. The same is the case in most developing countries, where the informal sector accounts for up to half of most economic activity.

While the informal sector accounts for a significant proportion of the workforce in the East African region, its impact on GDP is largely outsized by the more formal sectors of the economy when the value of output is taken into consideration.The informal sector in Kenya only accounts for slightly above 30% of the GDP. Over 60% of those working in this sector are youth between 18–35 years, and half of them are women.

The resulting assumption, as is characteristic of the informal sector in an economy, is that a majority of the players do not register or comply with any regulations.They…