Wednesday, February 21

Agribusiness

Cash-crops-in-Africa
  • Sustainable agriculture employs 65-70 percent of Africa's labour force.
  • Only two to three percent of African renewable water resources are usable compared to the 5 percent worldwide.
  • In 2019 a report revealed that Africa produced more than 50 percent of the world's cassava.

A severe drought has left millions of people in Africa dependent on grain from Ukraine, a country at war with Russia, yet a number of crops that could support more climate-resilient and healthful food systems in sub-Saharan Africa continue to receive limited attention.

Across Africa, cassava, sugarcane and maize stand out for supporting millions of families in governments' quest to maintain food security

Sustainable agriculture is one of the highlights that support Africa's economic development. For decades these cash crops in Africa have accounted for almost 20 percent of the entire continent's revenue. It has further advanced and introduced concepts such as agritech, significantly teaching better farming

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(L-R) Dr. Henry Nakalet Opolot, Project Coordinator for ACDP and Assistant Commisioner at Ministry of Agriculture, Industry and Fisheries, Government of Uganda hands over the winning certificate and award to William Luyinda, CEO & Co-Founder of EzyAgric and Esther Karwera Co-Founder & Chief Commercial Officer, EzyAgric Uganda.
  • Limited internet access is inhibiting the uptake of agricultural innovations across Africa.
  • While Agriculture remains the backbone of Africa’s economy, farmers in rural areas are yet to benefit from the innovative solutions designed to increase productivity within the sector.
  • Innovative solutions are the key to boosting employment and increasing youth participation in the agricultural sector.

Limited internet access is inhibiting the uptake of agricultural innovations across Africa. This is according to Hon. Frank Tumwebaze, Uganda’s Minister for Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries.

Speaking at the sidelines of the two-day Africa-Korea Agtech Innovation Summit held in Nairobi, Hon. Tumwebaze, said,While Agriculture remains the backbone of Africa’s economy, farmers in rural areas are yet to benefit from the innovative solutions designed to increase productivity within the sector.”

The Uganda Minister emphasized the role of Governments’ investment in internet penetration across Africa’s rural areas. This will aid in adoption of

Africa Agri expo pic
  • Kenya is set to host the 6th edition of Africa Agri Expo in February 2023 amidst dwindling growth in the Agricultural sector. 
  • The expo is aimed at bringing the entire agricultural value chain under one roof and open up a vibrant platform for agribusiness experts.
  • Some of the key areas of focus during the event include irrigation, crop protection, technology, food safety & security,  mechanisation, investment opportunities as well as government policies.

Kenya is set to host the 6th edition of Africa Agri Expo in February 2023 amidst dwindling growth in the agricultural sector. 

The expo which has been endorsed by the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock Development is aimed at bringing the entire agricultural value chain under one roof and open up a vibrant platform for agribusiness experts, top global companies, key policymakers and other stakeholders to explore the commercial opportunities in the continent through effective meetings and networking

Farmers in Mozambique. The purpose of agricultural value chain analysis (AVCA) is to increase efficiency, productivity and competitiveness of an agricultural sub-sector or industry. www.theexchange.africa

Agriculture value chain analysis, also commonly referred to as mapping the agriculture value chain, is the assessment of the value chain participants and factors influencing the performance of the agricultural commodity industry and evaluating the relationships between these participants to identify the main constraints.

The purpose of agricultural value chain analysis (AVCA) is to increase the efficiency, productivity and competitiveness of an agricultural sub-sector or industry and develop solutions for how the identified constraints can be overcome.

AVCA assists in developing an understanding of how value chain actors/participants deal with powers and who governs or influences the chain.…

Ghana allocates US$105 million to rehabilitate irrigation schemes. www.theexchange.africa

There are twenty-two irrigations projects under GIDA, covering 6,505 hectares. Additionally, there are twenty-two schemes constructed under the Small Scale Irrigation Development Project (SSIDP) and six schemes under the (Small Farms Irrigation Project) SFIP.

The SSIDP and the SFIP projects are all less than 1,000 hectares in size, except for the Tono and Kpong Irrigation Projects, which have about 2,500 hectares and are overdeveloped.

The primary beneficiaries of the irrigation projects have been indigenous small-scale farmers. However, the outputs have not been very encouraging, and the lack of maintenance of the projects has rendered most of the schemes unproductive.

Moreover, 14 companies have been enlisted and have taken up more than 3,000 hectares of land to cultivate commercial farming operations.…

Ghana hosts largest agricultural exhibition. www.theexchange.africa

Thomas James, Agritech West Africa’s project director, said that the rising demand for food and the targeted food growth in Ghana and West Africa requires innovation and mechanization in agriculture patterns. This could be done by adopting new and modern agriculture technologies, machines, crop care practices, irrigation, warehousing and storage facilities.

Ghana has invested heavily in mechanisation in agriculture, importing Tractors, Spares, Implements, Agrochemicals and Irrigation setups worth US$1 billion. Annually, Ghana imports over 10,000 tractors and their associated implements and parts.

The seminars, pre-fixed meetings and conferences in the exhibition will help Ghanaian and West African agriculture-based companies an opportunity to network with manufacturers and suppliers from across the globe.…

A banana crop. Banana and plantain are important staple foods in many developing countries, especially in Africa. www.theexchange.africa

In 2015, the PLOS Pathogen journey noted that a fungus dubbed Tropical Race 4 had already decimated the crop in Southeast Asia over a number of decades.

According to the independent, the disease was first discovered in Australia, Jordan, Mozambique, Pakistan, the Middle East and Africa in 2013. It is so severe that it had destroyed whole plantations.

Fears were that it was just a matter of time before it landed in Latin America. At the time, in 2015, researchers warned that developing new banana cultivars was an arduously expensive affair that would probably not curtail the spread of the disease in time.

Years later, the banana crop remains resilient in most parts of Africa with the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) saying that banana and plantain are important staple foods in many developing countries, especially in Africa.…

Culture Trip

The National Project for Developing the Egyptian Countryside is an initiative estimated to cost US$1.11 trillion. This project will impact at least 1,350,366 households. President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi said in January 2021 that the project would be completed in three years. US$519.28 million of the total funding will come from the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).

The government that took power in 2014 inaugurated a series of projects to reignite Egypt's economy. As a result, Egypt's planning minister, Hala al-Saeed, expects the country's economy to grow to 5.6 percent in the FY2021-22. Prime Minister, Mostafa Madbouly, referred to Haya Karima as an "icon" project that will help Egypt rebuild its economy and better the lives of more than half the population in Egypt.…

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Tanganda Tea Estates, Zimbabwe. www.theexchange.africa

There is a lot of hype around the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange (ZSE).

For instance, it is said to have had the best performance of African stock market indices over the first nine months of 2020, according to a consolidated report by the African Markets platform. During that period the Zimbabwe All-Share Index, the main index of this financial market, grew by 612 per cent.

This was when values were calculated using local currency. When the values are calculated using US$ and Euros the market still posted some very impressive returns of 46.6 per cent and 40 per cent respectively. This implies that investors who made hard currency investments in African markets made the most money from their investments in Zimbabwe… A caveat is in order here because these are merely statistics…

In 2020, only Malawi and Rwanda had their stock markets post positive returns albeit marginal with returns of 6.8…

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