Women in Business

Affirmative Finance Action for Women in Africa (AFAWA)

Women entrepreneurs from Africa have a reason to smile following a move by the African Development Bank Group to launch a project seeking to enhance viability and sustainability of these businesses.

While all countries will be considered, preference will be given to proposals implemented in the following countries: Cameroon, Congo, Democratic Republique of Congo, Gabon, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Morocco, Mozambique, Senegal, South Africa,Tanzania, Rwanda and Zambia to align with the ongoing Affirmative Finance Action for Women in Africa (AFAWA) Guarantee for Growth Program pipeline.

The AFAWA program dubbed allows entrepreneurship enablers, which include business associations and civil society organizations, play an important role in empowering women to establish bankable SMEs and other businesses.

However, the enablers themselves often face challenges, such as long-term growth plans and lack of financing, which reduce their reach, impact and sustainability.

Funding requests may be for a specific project or for an indicative program …

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March 8th marked the celebrations of International Women’s day under the theme 'choose to challenge'. As women across the world choose to challenge societal norms and the traditional disregard of women, African women are steering the growth of the continent as pivotal players.

A commonly shared African proverb says, ‘when you educate a boy, you train a man; if you educate a girl, you train a village.’ This proverb simply highlights the impact women have on the community when given a chance and a voice. In the economic history of the African community, women were sidelined and viewed as lesser than their male counterparts.…

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The confirmation of Dr. Ngozi Okonjo Iweala as the World Trade Organization’s new head is a positive development. Having previously been blocked by the Trump administration, it is a welcome relief that it has finally come to fruition. 

There are questions as to the reasons behind her blockade in the first place. Could it be her nation of origin? Perhaps a discomfort about bringing governance of the world’s largest trade organization to Africa? Or possibly the fact that she is a woman? Perchance some are not ready for female leadership. Judging from how long the US presidency has been a boys-only club, it begs to reason that this might be a plausible reason. 

Regardless of the reasoning, Dr. Ngozi Okonjo Iweala’s history precedes her. She is no stranger to breaking barriers, having been appointed as the first female finance minister under two different sitting presidents in Nigeria. She has also