Browsing: Russian Oil

www.theexchange.africa

For practical reasons, European gas buyers need to find a way to make up for the supplies missing from Russia. And for both policy and practical reasons, Brussels wants to deny Moscow the opportunity to continue using gas supplies as a blunt instrument with which to threaten Europe in the future.

The change isn’t going to be immediate. Reducing Russia’s profile in the EU’s energy mix will take time. But the process of supply reduction is underway, and it has already opened up new opportunities for African gas producers to acquire market share in Europe. I expect those opportunities to last beyond the near term as the EU attempts to establish a new combination of gas suppliers to replace Russia over the next few years. 

I also hope Africa’s emerging gas producers take advantage of new LNG technologies, such as the modular Fast LNG solutions offered by New Fortress Energy (NFE), a U.S.-based company, to meet European demand for gas. With these technologies, they won’t have to wait as long or spend as much money to begin producing the LNG that European consumers are clamouring to buy.

On March 8, Saudi and Emirati leaders snubbed US President Joe Biden over the Ukraine crisis.

Reports, according to the Wall Street Journal,  show that the White House unsuccessfully tried to build international support for Ukraine and contain a rise in oil prices. The Middle East and US officials quoted by the WSJ indicated that the calls were because of an increase in oil prices caused by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Saudi Arabia’s and the UAE’s authorities declined to speak with Biden.

Is the writing in the wall for the US now that it allies have become unresponsive in recent weeks?

In the first week of March, OPEC+, which includes Russia, refused to raise oil production.

OPEC+ consists of 13 OPEC members and 10 of the world’s major non-OPEC oil-exporting countries. The OPEC+ entity aims to regulate oil supply to set the world market price.

As a gigantic energy superpower, Russia’s foreign direct investment (FDI) accounts for less than 1 per cent of Africa’s total FDI.

However, African Business argued that, with Russia being a small trading partner to Africa compared to the United States and China, the impact on trade would be marginal—yet few Africa developing economies such as Uganda will be more exposed.

Further, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) data show that Russia accounts for 2 to 3 per cent of Africa’s trade with the world—most of it is exports.

“Russia also accounts for 2 per cent of the world’s exports to Africa, and only 0.5 per cent imports from the continent” African Business.