Browsing: World Health Organisation (WHO)

X0000 Ardian Symplicity Treatment
  • Dr. Patil VijaySinh, an interventional cardiologist at The Nairobi West Hospital, led the team in performing the Renal Artery Denervation procedure.
  • Hypertension, commonly known as high blood pressure, is a major global health concern, contributing to an estimated 8.5 million deaths in 2015 alone.
  • Innovative healthcare techniques like Renal Artery Denervation offer new hope for patients with resistant hypertension.

The Nairobi West Hospital has successfully conducted the first Renal Artery Denervation procedure for resistant hypertension in Kenya and East Africa.

This pioneering procedure marks a significant step forward in the region’s battle against hypertension, a leading cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide.

Hypertension, commonly known as high blood pressure, is a major global health concern, contributing to an estimated 8.5 million deaths in 2015 alone.

Despite the availability of various antihypertensive medications, only 18-23 per cent of patients achieve optimal blood pressure control.

In Kenya, prevalence of hypertension is …

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  • World Health Organization (WHO) has urged countries to follow science and the International Health Regulations (2005) instead of imposing flight bans on southern African nations due to concerns over the new Omicron variant
  • WHO said travel restrictions might play a role in slightly reducing the spread of COVID-19 but place a heavy burden on lives and livelihoods

As a growing number of countries impose flight bans on southern African nations due to concerns over the new Omicron variant, World Health Organization (WHO) urges countries to follow science and the International Health Regulations (2005).

In a statement, WHO said travel restrictions might play a role in slightly reducing the spread of COVID-19 but place a heavy burden on lives and livelihoods.

If restrictions are implemented, they should not be unnecessarily invasive or intrusive and should be scientifically based, according to the International Health Regulations, a legally binding instrument of international law …

ZERO Malaria- WHO

Two years ago, Kenya’s Ministry of Health launched the malaria vaccine in Ndhiwa, Homabay County, one of the eight counties in western Kenya with the heaviest burden of malaria nationwide.

At that time, other African countries including Ghana and Malawi also launched the malaria vaccine in childhood vaccination in selected areas of high malaria transmission in 2019.
Malawi was the first to do so in April, followed by Ghana, and then by Kenya in 2019.
Malaria vaccine has now become the first to achieve WHO-specified 75 per cent efficacy goal.
According to a recent update on the vaccine by the World Health Organisation, high-level vaccine efficacy of 77% in African children achieve WHO-specified efficacy goal of 75%.
The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that malaria causes over 400,000 deaths each year globally and progress in reducing malaria mortality has stalled in recent years. Most deaths are amongst children in Africa …

The dream of a world without hunger seemed achievable three years ago. However, with increasing challenges such as those recorded recently like the locust invasion and the novel Corona Virus (COVID-19) that is still wrecking lives across the globe, the future looks bleak. 

Africa accounts for the highest number of people suffering acute food insecurity due to conflicts and tensions between communities.  

According to the 2020 Global Report on Food Crisis (GRFC 2020): “In East Africa, armed conflicts, intercommunal violence and other localized tensions continued to affect peace and security.” 

Moreover, “the upheaval that has been set in motion by the COVID-19 pandemic may push even more families and communities into deeper distress, António Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations, added in the Forward of the report.  

Also Read: Crop insurance to ensure food security and poverty reduction

The global food policy report published April

Denmark’s $2 million support for Uganda’s COVID-19

The Government of Denmark yesterday signed a grant worth $2 million to support the COVID-19 response in Uganda.

The $ 2 million grant will be used to acquire masks and Personal Protective Equipment (PPEs) for health workers and will also support the improvement of Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) services in Uganda’s selected districts. The Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and the World Health Organization (WHO) will be used to channel the grant.

Nicolaj Petersen, the Danish Ambassador to Uganda, extended his government’s appreciation to the Government of Uganda for implementing strategic and effective measures to prevent and manage the COVID-19 pandemic at the signing ceremony.

“Uganda has managed to control the spread of the Coronavirus so far. Only 81 cases have been confirmed, most of which were detected at entry”, he said.

Also Read: IMF boosts Kenya, Uganda war on COVID-19 with $1.23 billion

Despite Uganda’s success so far, Ambassador …